They said that this anniversary wouldn’t happen

January 30, 2016.  Because it was Saturday, Michell and Dad were awake at 4:00 A.M., and within the next 50 minutes Dad had had his usual breakfast of Cream of Wheat, had dressed himself, and he was ready and waiting for the HOP bus to take them to dialysis. During his dialysis session, 1200 ml fluid was removed, which was the minimum amount that they could remove.

In Houston, I slept in until the sinfully late hour of 7:00 A.M.  I took care of a few errands and was on the road to Temple by 11:30 A.M. Shortly after I drove from I610 to US290, Dad and Michell arrived back home. They enjoyed grilled cheese sandwiches, and at 1:30 P.M., Dad was ready to lie down for a nap.

anniversaryCross3Michell learned yesterday that her mother was in the hospital and would most likely require surgery to remove her gallbladder. She immediately contacted Becky, the owner of One On One Personal Home Care Services to notify her that she wanted to leave Saturday (today), three days before the end of her shift. Had I been in her shoes, I would have left in a heartbeat, but the selfish side of me hoped that her mother would recover quickly and not require post-op care from Michell. Becky called my mother and told her that Joanie would be replacing Michell. Joanie was traveling from Palestine, Texas, about a 2-1/2 hour drive from my parents’ home. Michell said that she would stay until Joanie arrived so that she could orient her. I was crossing my fingers that we’d see Michell again.

Because we anticipated a late arrival from Joanie, Michell joined us for dinner. Joanie was an experienced aide, and Michell was able to complete the orientation within 30 minutes and was driving away by 8:00 P.M. By the time that Joanie and I got Dad to bed, it was after 9:00 P.M. Dad had made it through the day without any vomiting. I was cautiously optimistic that he was getting better. By the time that I got upstairs and finished my call with Stan, it was 10:00 P.M.

January 31. At 4:30 A.M., I was awakened by the nerve-grating alarm on the Kangaroo pump. Joanie had added more Nepro to the tube feed bag, but the pump couldn’t move the fluid. Every so often, an air gap appeared in the line and we had to prime the pump, which was the case now. I showed Joanie how to prime it, but I didn’t expect her to encounter the problem again. I returned to bed and slept fitfully for another hour until I heard Dad waking up.

With a little assistance from Joanie, Dad got up and dressed, and wheeled himself into the kitchen to visit with Mom. The four of us ate eggs and homemade English muffins for breakfast. When we finished breakfast, Dad wheeled himself back to his room, and I gave him his morning meds and administered his trach care. Mom and I left for church at 10:20 A.M., and Dad took a nap while we were gone.

blueberryNewtonDad was awake and feeling well when we returned from church at 1:00 P.M., and he ate a couple of slices of turkey and two Blueberry Newtons for lunch. I don’t know what had possessed Mom to buy the Blueberry Netwons; they’re not nearly as good as the original Fig Newtons. I love blueberries, but these cookies had a strong taste of artificial flavoring.

After lunch, Dad used the walker to walk around the yard with Joanie. Within 15 minutes he came back indoors, saying that he felt nauseous, and then started vomiting mucus. I found it interesting that within two hours of eating, he would vomit mucus and not his lunch.

anniversaryCross2He started feeling better and then went outside and sat on the patio for about 30 minutes. My parents’ 67th wedding anniversary was in a couple of days and I needed to go to the store to get them a card. There are no special gifts for 67 years, but this anniversary seemed especially special. Fewer than 150 days ago, we were told that this anniversary would never come. Hallmark didn’t have any “thank goodness you survived” anniversary cards. Walgreens was the perfect place to buy a greeting card. Not only could you buy a card, but you could also pick up a bottle of wine. When I left Walgreens with my card and wine, I stopped by the Scott & White Pharmacy to pick up a couple of prescription refills for Dad.

A dear friend of mine was experiencing some angst with the medical industry. Her father had had some surgery during the past summer, and at least one of the medical professionals had made some bonehead mistakes that had impacted her father’s recovery. We chatted on the phone and compared war stories. We could write a book.

anniversaryCross2To get some carbs and protein into Dad, I prepared a salmon and pasta salad for dinner. While Dad had been in the hospital, keeping ourselves nourished was a challenge. I often prepared multiple casseroles on the weekends and froze them. Consequently, I could now fix a mean pasta casserole with lots of vegetables and protein. I also loved casseroles because they provided at least one night of leftovers.

Instead of teaching Joanie how to play Oh Hell, I thought that it would be a nice change to play Yahtzee, and Mom won. By 7:30 P.M., we were starting Dad’s nighttime routine. He had reached the point where he could practically guide Joanie through the routine. By 8:00 P.M., he was falling asleep.

February 1. Today marked the 125th day since Dad’s discharge from the Scott & White Continuing Care Hospital. When I woke up at my usual time, I thought that I heard some unusual sounds coming from Dad’s room. I lived in fear that something dreadful would happen to him during the night, a fear that had started during his hospitalization. I got out of bed and went downstairs to Dad’s room to check on him. I was relieved to see that he was just sleeping, and I went back upstairs to dress and get ready to work.

By 5:00 A.M., Dad and Joanie were awake. With little assistance from Joanie, Dad got dressed and then wheeled himself into the kitchen for his breakfast of Cream of Wheat and figs.

anniversaryCross3I spent most of the morning working with the office door closed. Shortly before 10:00 A.M., I heard Mom and Dad talking with someone who didn’t sound like Joanie, but the voice sounded somewhat familiar. When I opened the door, I heard the unmistakable voice of Dianne. Joanie was scheduled to return to a client’s home tomorrow and needed to return home today. Evidently, Becky had texted Dianne and had asked her if she would return a couple of days early and stay with us for nine days instead of seven. Dianne sometimes grated on my nerves, but I was glad (practically thrilled) to see her again. I hadn’t realized how much she simplified my life.

About an hour later, Brenda arrived for Dad’s physical therapy session, and she really put him through the paces. Dad’s goal for this 30-day period was to walk with a cane, and she was doling out the balance exercises in earnest. Usually, she wanted us to work with Dad on some of the exercises between sessions, but today she told us that he should only do these exercises when she was present. Before she left, she had him lie on the bed and do some of his bed exercises to improve his core muscles.

anniversaryCross2When Brenda left at noon, I took a lunch break, and the four of us enjoyed some leftover meatloaf. Shortly after lunch, Dad was ready for a little nap, which is all he got. He had been sleeping for about 20 minutes when the doorbell rang. We all assumed that it was Kristen, but it was just a delivery of medical supplies. Dad dozed for another 20 minutes before Kristen arrived for his swallow therapy session. Once again, she restated that Dad must guard his airway and that he should exercise between sessions. I was pretty certain that the therapists felt like they were whistling in the wind when they provided guidance about behavior and exercise. Fortunately, Dad improved in spite of himself. If he had exercised during the time that it took to come up with the excuses for not exercising, he would have been the Richard Simmons of home care.

After Kristen left, Dad and Dianne walked around outside, and Mom and I ran a couple of errands.

During happy hour, we watched the news. After dinner, we played Oh Hell, and I won. The Iowa caucus was tonight, and when I went to bed, Cruz, Trump, Rubio, and Carson (in that order) were leading the pack.

anniversaryCross1February 2.  It was dialysis day, so we were all up early. Because it was their anniversary, Mom gave Dad some extra figs with his Cream of Wheat. Dad and Dianne were ready and on the HOP bus by 5:45 A.M. During dialysis, 1200 ml of fluid was removed, and he was finished with dialysis by 10:30 A.M. Unfortunately, the bus didn’t pick him up from the dialysis center until 12:30 P.M. He and Dianne were pretty steamed about the delay.

We had lunch around 1:00 P.M. and I got on Dad’s case twice for not swallowing correctly. He got mad at me for yelling at him. I just could not make him understand how important it was for him to concentrate on swallowing. Kristen had also been adamant that Dad not talk while eating, but it seemed that he never stopped talking. I was usually wound up pretty tight during meals.

At 2:00 P.M. he took a nap and slept for a couple of hours. He had wanted to go outside, but somehow he and Dianne never made it outside. Dianne had talked about having him work on his bed exercises, but that didn’t happen either.

anniversaryCross1In addition to watching the news during happy hour, we acknowledged my parents’ 67th wedding anniversary. Mom and I had been able to purchase cards, but Dad’s road trips were still very limited. Dad loves salmon, and Mom fixed us a nice salmon and broccoli dinner for their anniversary.

After dinner, we played Oh Hell and Dad won—our anniversary gift to him. By 7:30 P.M., the festivities were over, and we started Dad’s nighttime routine. By 8:15 P.M., he was asleep.

February 3. Because Dad had complained that the Nepro made him feel too full to eat during the day, Dianne and I decided to administer his prescribed three cans during the night. The tube-feed bag held only two cans of Nepro, which meant that Dianne would need to refill it sometime around 2:00 A.M. On most nights, like last night, she was successful in keeping the tube-feed bag full. For the most part, Dad liked this arrangement.

anniversaryCross2We had an early appointment with Dr. Pfanner and the tube feed team (Julie and Talitha) and had made arrangements with the HOP to be picked up at 7:15 A.M. Dianne and Dad rode in the bus, and Mom and I followed in my car. As we were walking into the clinic lobby, Dad felt sick and vomited into a trash receptacle. Thank goodness we were on our way to see the gastroenterologist. I hoped that he could shed some light on the cause of Dad’s vomiting.

Talitha and Julie both had medical students in tow, so the small exam room was very crowded. During this visit, Dad would have his PEG changed. To ensure that you don’t encounter problems with it deflating and falling out, a PEG should be changed every couple of months. Talitha and Tiffany, her student, changed out Dad’s PEG. Dr. Pfanner was extremely pleased with Dad’s progress and said that by all rights, he should be dead and that 90% of the cases like Dad’s don’t end well. I hoped that Dad would hear what the doctor was saying and understand just how serious his condition was and how tenuous his situation was. Instead, all that he heard was how well he was doing and how well he looked. Unfortunately, no one could offer any insight into the intermittent vomiting.

The doctor wanted to see us again in another month, and we tried to make an appointment for March 2nd on our way out, but that day was not available. I would have to call them later when I had Dad’s calendar handy.

anniversaryCross3We got back home around 9:45 A.M. Mondays were usually busy, and today was no exception. We ate an early lunch and Dad helped himself to some leftover salmon and an English muffin.

Brenda arrived shortly after noon for Dad’s physical therapy session, and she gave him a real workout. He was able to rest for an hour before Kristen arrived for Dad’s swallow therapy session.

As she had told us during her last visit, she had Dad eat one of Mom’s pumpkin cookies with some water, which was the first time in almost a year that he had eaten a solid with a thin liquid. The test seemed to go well, and Kristen reminded him about the importance of protecting his airway. As she was leaving, Kristen told me that she had four more sessions with Dad, so February 17 would be her last day. To accommodate some other plans that I had for that day, I asked if she could make it the 19th, and she agreed.

Shortly after 4:00 P.M., I changed out Dad’s trach for what I hoped would be the last time. During Dad’s appointment with the pulmonologist on January 4, the doctor had contemplated removing Dad’s trach, so I was hopefully optimistic that he would be decannulated during his upcoming appointment. Today, the removed trach looked much better than it did the last time, and Dad’s stoma was much smaller. Even Dianne commented about the smaller diameter of the stoma. Dad didn’t cough very much after the changout, which was a nice change. The smaller trach tube enabled Dad to more easily handle his secretions, which might have contributed to the improved appearance of the trach.

After happy hour, we ate leftover casserole for dinner followed by Mom’s fabulous homemade lemon meringue pie.

By 7:30 P.M., Dad had walloped us at Oh Hell and was on his way to bed.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s