Out of ICU, but not the sort of day we had envisioned

August 28, 2018. Mom and I arrived at the hospital at 8:00 A.M. This was Dad’s first day out of the ICU, and we were optimistic about the day. When we arrived at room 634 North, Dad was sleeping, and I thought that he looked terrible. His face was more swollen than I had ever seen it. Also, I was concerned about his coloring, so I wondered about his oxygen saturation. We were able to wake him, but he kept dropping off to sleep in mid-sentence. His oxygen mask had been removed, and I didn’t know if he kept dropping off to sleep because of low oxygen, fluid overload, or if he was just naturally sleepy. He complained of constant interruptions during the night and said that someone had come into his room this morning, but I was never sure if he was remembering dreams or reality.

transitionCross1At 8:15 A.M., Conner, Dad’s nurse, entered Dad’s room for the first time since the shift change at 7:00 A.M. Following our introductions, she accessed Dad’s chart and told us that Dr. Jennifer Moran, the attending physician for 6 North, had asked for someone in Orthopedics to look at Dad’s surgical wound vac. It had been in place for more than five days, and it seemed to the doctor that it might be clogged. When I asked her if Dad was scheduled to receive physical therapy, she said that only speech therapy was on his schedule, but she would ask for physical or occupational therapy today.

When I asked if he was scheduled for interventional radiology (IR) to have the clog in his fistula removed, she confirmed that he was on the IR schedule for 1:00 P.M. today. With the IR appointment scheduled for the afternoon, I was fairly certain that Dad would not receive dialysis today. However, his ability to receive dialysis hinged on whether or not IR could clear the clog in his fistula.

transitionCross2I had barely finished speaking with Conner when someone from the Transportation team arrived to take Dad to IR. I should have learned a long time ago that schedules in the hospital were fluid and much like those of remodeling contractors. To help the Transportation aide prepare and move Dad to the gurney, Conner summoned Miguel, Dad’s aide (CNA). I learned then that Dad had indeed remembered reality and that it was Miguel who had interrupted Dad’s sleep early this morning.

Because someone had to sign a consent form before IR could perform the procedure, one of us needed to accompany him to IR. Either one of us could sign, but we both wanted to accompany Dad, who was now sleeping soundly on the gurney. We arrived at IR at 8:35 A.M. Ten minutes later, Nathan, an IR nurse took Dad’s vitals and obtained some background information about Dad from us.

transitionCross2One of the interventional radiologists is a member of FUMC-Temple, my parents’ church. I was pleased when I saw that it was Dr. Dollar who entered Dad’s bay. I reminded him that Dad had been a patient of his twice before and told him that Mom and I had attended his daughter’s confirmation. We joked that the pastor would give the doctor hell if the procedure didn’t go well. Before Mom and I left Dad, Dr. Dollar mentioned that because the attending physician wanted to know if Dad had Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT), they would test him for that. Because Dialysis patients usually received Heparin before and during dialysis to prevent blood clots, they could develop HIT over time. We woke Dad, kissed him, and let him know that we would be waiting in his room for him. At 9:20 A.M., Kristi, the IR surgical nurse, wheeled Dad from his bay and Mom and I found our way to the x-ray waiting room.

Mom needed to have some of her heart medicine prescriptions refilled. Unfortunately, her primary care physician who wrote the prescriptions had recently retired. I thought that Mom’s cardiologist should prescribe all of her heart medications, and we decided to schedule an appointment for Mom to see her. Because Mom’s cardiologist works in the Scott and White Heart Center, which is located on the first floor of the hospital, we decided to spend some of our wait time scheduling an appointment.

transitionCross2At 10:25 A.M., Mom and I walked back to the x-ray waiting room to check on Dad’s status. We were told that they were almost finished and that we could wait there to speak with the surgical nurse. A few minutes later, Kristi, who had assisted Dr. Dollar, said that they were able to remove the clot and that he should be able to have dialysis at any time, which was excellent news. Because this procedure had been successful, Dad would not require another procedure to insert a dialysis catheter, which could have increased his odds at contracting an infection.

We arrived at Dad’s room about 15 minutes before he did and in time to speak to the nephrology team, which was making their morning rounds. They asked us if we knew the results of Dad’s procedure. When I relayed what Kristi had told us, they said that they would schedule Dad for dialysis this afternoon. I had been very worried about Dad’s apparent fluid overload condition this morning and was pleased that he would have some of that excess fluid removed today. He had had a lot of dialysis in the eight days that he had been here. I prayed that he could maintain his blood pressure until all of the excess fluid was removed.

When Dad returned to his room, Conner changed the bandages that protected his recent skin tears and took his vitals, which were great. She also said that she would remove the annoying wound vac that had been left on by the orthopedic surgery team. It didn’t seem to be helping Dad’s situation and was just another annoyance for him.

transitionCross1Mom and I left for lunch at 11:30 A.M. so that we could get back to Dad’s room before he went to dialysis at 1:00 P.M. However, when we arrived at Dad’s room at 12:45 P.M., he was already gone. At 1:00 P.M., Conner stopped by Dad’s room. She told us that she had just returned from accompanying him to the dialysis room, and would be glad to take us there so that we could be with Dad. I had a deadline to attend to and opted to stay in Dad’s room while Mom went to sit with Dad.

At 2:30 P.M., Mary, a hospital pharmacist, came to Dad’s room to ask me about his at-home medications. She wondered if Dad was using more than one pharmacy because most of his medications had not been refilled in quite some time. I found this news disturbing, yet not surprising. Dad often (defiantly) said that he was not taking his medications. There was one, Renvela, that I hoped that she would find had been refilled at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, but I wasn’t holding out much hope.

transitionCross2At 3:40 P.M., Dr. Potter and Dr. Murdette stopped by to check on Dad’s fistula. Dr. Potter is Scott & White’s new transplant surgeon and had replaced Dr. Gregory Jaffers, who had recently retired. The transplant team performs the fistula surgery, and Dr. Jaffers had performed Dad’s fistula surgery in 2016. Dr. Potter said that he had been in surgery all day and hadn’t had a chance to see Dad and had hoped to meet him. I assumed that Dr. Potter had heard about the clot in Dad’s fistula and thought that he should meet him should he have to repair the fistula. I told him that the IR procedure had gone well and that Dad was having dialysis now.

Dad and Mom returned from dialysis at 5:15 P.M. As Conner was getting him resituated in the room, she told me that they were able to remove only 500 ml from him today because his blood pressure kept dropping. After receiving that disappointing news, I asked her about the results from his latest labs, which were run this morning. It seemed that his WBC count had jumped from a normal range of 10 yesterday to an elevated 14 this morning. I was very concerned that Dad was fighting a new infection.

transitionCross1Dr. Moran stopped by at 6:15 P.M. I expressed my alarm at Dad’s elevated WBC count, but she didn’t think that it was an issue because he didn’t have an elevated fever and his blood pressure was good. She told me that today was the last day of her rotation. Starting tomorrow morning, Dr. Hunt would take over as the attending physician. If Dad was developing an infection, she said that Dr. Hunt would be a good attending physician for Dad; in addition to being an internist, he was also certified for infectious diseases.

Mom and I left the hospital at 7:15 P.M., tired and unsure of Dad’s status. I hoped that Dad’s uptick in his WBC count was of no concern. Mom and I were both tired, and I was now worried about her continued weight loss. She suddenly seemed frail to me and she had no energy. She also had no appetite and I could not get her to eat more than a couple of bites of dinner; however, she did eat an ice cream cone.

transitionCross3I had only planned for a short trip to Temple for Dad’s surgery on August 22, and I was now out of clean clothes. It seemed like my trip would be extended for some indeterminate time, so I had to wash some clothes before I could go to bed. I was tired and frustrated and capped off my evening by being a jerk and snapping at my exhausted mother.

Before going to bed, I called my husband, Stan, and updated him on the activities of the day. Before we hung up, Stan said that tomorrow would be a better day. From his lips to God’s ear.

 

 

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